Last edited by Dogis
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

5 edition of The folklore of East Anglia. found in the catalog.

The folklore of East Anglia.

by Enid Porter

  • 190 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Rowman and Littlefield in Totowa, N.J .
Written in English

    Places:
  • East Anglia (England),
  • England,
  • East Anglia.
    • Subjects:
    • Folklore -- England -- East Anglia.,
    • East Anglia (England) -- Social life and customs.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. [185]

      StatementDrawings by Gay John Galsworthy.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsGR142.E37 P67 1974
      The Physical Object
      Pagination192 p.
      Number of Pages192
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5041898M
      ISBN 100874715202
      LC Control Number74001160
      OCLC/WorldCa810972

      East Anglia’s rich archaeological heritage exists alongside fables, legends and stories, exemplified by the ghost stories of M. R. James. As a Cambridge based archaeologist, medievalist and curator, James was born and bred in the region, and was privy to its odd corners and folklore.   Publication of Bogie Tales of East Anglia by M. H. James. My edition of the earliest book devoted to East Anglian folklore, Bogie Tales of East Anglia () by Margaret Helen James, has just been published. Bogie Tales is an important folklore collection which pre-dates the better-known collection of Suffolk folklore by Eveline Gurdon (published in ), but this first book devoted to East.

      - CORSAIR: VOUGHT'S F4U IN WWII AND KOREA (LEGENDS OF WARFARE) - GRUMMAN J2F DUCK: US Navy, Marine Corps, Army Air Force and Coast Guard Use in WWII - McDONNELL DOUGLAS PHANTOM II at George Air Force Base, California, - - B STRATOFORTRESS: Boeing's Iconic Bomber From to the Present (Legends of. Hero-Myths and Legends of the British Race by Maud Isabel Ebbutt [] Folk-lore of Shakespeare by T.F. Thiselton Dyer [] A comprehensive reference to Elizabethan folklore and cultural references in Shakespeare and his contemporaries. The English and Scottish .

        East Anglia’s rich archaeological heritage exists alongside fables, legends and stories, exemplified by the ghost stories of M. R. James. As a Cambridge based archaeologist, medievalist and curator, James was born and bred in the region, and was privy to its odd corners and folklore.   Indeed thanks to its mudflats and marshes, its crumbling cliffs and shifting shingle, in East Anglia as a whole the sea is more present, and the line between countryside and seaside more blurred.


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The folklore of East Anglia by Enid Porter Download PDF EPUB FB2

This site is basically a gathering of every legend that I've found in over 40 years of collecting tales throughout my native East Anglia, and through exploring old books, periodicals and manuscripts. Some of the + legends here appear in no books that I know The folklore of East Anglia.

book, while others haven't seen the li. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Porter, Enid. Folklore of East Anglia. London, Batsford [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Porter, Enid. Folklore of East Anglia.

Totowa, N.J., Rowman and Littlefield [] (OCoLC) Document Type. The Old Stories is a collection of folk tales that were written in East Anglia. These are mostly short stories re-printed and slightly updated by Kevin Crossley-Holland. There are a couple of nice tales amongst the collection but this is a disappointing work and the main reason for that disappointment is that these stories are mainly written in /5(6).

Originally published inBogie Tales of East Anglia by Margaret Helen James was the first book devoted to the folklore of East Anglia. However, the book vanished into obscurity soon after publication, and has never been reprinted until now.

Featuring witchcraft, ghosts, charms, traditional cures, legendary tales and an assortment of Author: M. James. Buy Folklore of East Anglia (The folklore of the British Isles) 1st Edition by Porter, Enid (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 1. Black Shuck, Old Shuck, Old Shock or simply Shuck is the name given to an East Anglian ghostly black dog which is said to roam the coastline and countryside of East Anglia, one of many ghostly black dogs recorded in folklore across the British Isles.

Accounts of Black Shuck form part of the folklore of Norfolk, Suffolk, the Cambridgeshire fens and Essex, and descriptions of the creature's. 2 days ago  "The feeling itself, it's pure euphoria. It's like a high, it's an addiction to me effectively." Photographer Harry Wheeler-Brand has good reason to celebrate his 18th birthday - after three years.

Now available as a free e-book, it includes a good number of local folk-tales and traditions. 3) Black Shuck of East Anglia. The tale: There are many tales of this creature: a huge, rough-coated black hound with fiery red eyes and slavering jaws.

One eyewitness tells how, inhe was cycling along a lonely road between Tolleshunt D’Arcy. Toft Hall gets a mention in Domesday Book: it had been held, TRE (In the Time of King Edward) by the Anglo-Saxon bishop of East Anglia, Stigand.

But Stigand wasn’t to remain in East Anglia, he was destined for greatness. Not only did he become the ‘King’s Bishop’ at Winchester (a much sought-after seat) but also Archbishop of Canterbury.

Part 1 - The Basic Mythology: ‘Saxon’ – ‘King’ – ‘Martyr’ – ‘Patron saint of East Anglia’ – ‘First patron saint of England’. All of these epithets can be applied to Edmund (or Eadmund), but for someone whose holy memory and cult of worship grew to enormous proportions in.

Enid Porter: The Folklore of East Anglia Enid Porter: The Folklore of Cambridgeshire Nigel Pennick: Secrets of East Anglian Magic Andrew Chumbley: The Azoetia One: The Grimoire of the Golden Toad Note: I am grateful to Ruth Kenyon for providing me with a video copy of “Moonstallion” to enable me to view and comment on it.

Originally published inBogie Tales of East Anglia by Margaret Helen James was the first book devoted to the folklore of East Anglia. However, the book vanished into obscurity soon after publication, and has never been reprinted until now.

Featuring witchcraft, ghosts, charms, traditional cures, legendary tales and an assortment of. The small village of Harpham in Yorkshire is home to a local folklore tale focused around a well in the field to the west of St.

John’s Church. William the Conqueror promised his army that the first man to reach the village would be named baron of the area. Folklore of East Anglia. Dec 8. It is described in ’s book ‘Highways and Byways in East Anglia: He takes the form of a huge black dog, and prowls along dark lanes and lonesome field footpaths, where, although his howling makes the hearer’s blood run cold, his footfalls make no sound.

Origin: East Anglia. Known for his abnormally large size, fiery, lamp-like eyes and black shaggy coat, Shuck is not only a sinister icon of legend, but a breed of paracanine.

Source: Enid Porter: ‘Folklore of East Anglia’ (Batsford, ), p Judy's Hole: This is the name now given to a former clay-pit on the northern edge of the village, by the side of which a witch named Judy Finch (or Old Judy) was said to have lived in the midth century.

The sole book James wrote, a collection of East Anglian folklore entitled Bogie Tales of East Anglia () is held by only a handful of libraries in the world, with copies selling privately for hundreds of pounds.

The tiny number of copies of the book that survive today suggest that it was a complete flop as far as the publisher was concerned.

East Anglia Books has one of the largest stocks of USAAF Unit Histories plus a wide range of second-hand titles, many now out-of-print and difficult to obtain. Use the search facility at the top right hand corner of the page to find the title you are looking for. (scroll down to see the results).

Kevin Crossley-Holland is a well-known poet and prize-winning author for children. His books include Waterslain Angels, a detective story set in north Norfolk inand Moored Man: A Cycle of North Norfolk Poems; Gatty's Tale, a medieval pilgrimage novel; and the Arthur trilogy (The Seeing Stone, At the Crossing-Places and King of the Middle March), which combines historical fiction /5(2).

Taking its name from the lost ‘black book’ of a famed Cambridgeshire witch, as well as plots of land sacrificed unto the spirits and the Old One himself, Nigel Pearson’s ‘The Devil’s Plantation’ guides the reader through the traditional witchcraft, old magic and folklore of East Anglia.

A practical guide to the traditional secrets of the magical practitioners of East Anglia. Containing a wealth of magical tradition, this book reveals its origins and mysteries and explains its underlying prnciples enabling the reader to come into a dynamic interaction with the 4/5(3).East Anglia is the flattest territory in the United Kingdom and this seems to have influenced its supernatural fauna and folklore.

Though fairy-lore, in the strictest sense, has not survived particularly well – with the partial exception of Lincolnshire – there are a number of unusual traditions about black dogs and other monsters of the Fenman’s fevered imagination.